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The Secrets To HIRING Your 1st (Or 100th) Employee

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The 10 Minute MBA, is a no-fluff daily podcast that teaches you practical business lessons you can use to grow your business immediately.

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Welcome to the ten minute MBA. I'm your host, Scott Dclary. On the ten minute Mba I give you actionable insight, strategies, tools techniques that you can use tomorrow to start scale grow n x Your Business. Today I'm going to be walking you through some of the basics of hiring the right employee. I'm not going to get two into the weeds. I want to give you some things to think about when you're hiring your first employee, your hundredth employee, whatever it may be. These things may seem like common sense when I read them out to you, but common sense isn't always common. So I took down a list of some of the things that, over my career, I found to be some of the highest indicators of an employee's success. So it may not always be job specific and they may not require the fifteen years of that person's life has been dedicated to the specific task that you're going to be hiring for. And that may come as a surprise to many people that are listening to this right now, because I know that the general consensus,...

...or perhaps maybe the legacy consensus, on how to hire is to find somebody who's done the job for very long time and then hire that person. But I'm here to tell you that there are other ways that you can hire and there are other ways that you can hire successfully in fine, incredible people that can do much more with much less supervision or much less instruction because of the personality that they bring to the table that a person who's been doing a job for the past ten, fifteen years would probably think to do. I'm going to teach you to find people that have the characteristics that will make them successful, regardless of where they're coming from. And Yeah, we're not talking about your hiring somebody who's coming from one background and then putting them into a medical role that requires a degree or certification. Let's not get ridiculous here. We're talking about people that, for example, if they are a sales rep in one industry, we can transplant them from one industry to another. Or we're talking about a really proficient marketer or really proficient financial individual or executive,...

...somebody who's worked in one industry who is looking to make an industry change or even a slight career change. That's fine, we can move from marketing to sales or sales to marketing and help read people reinvent their career. But these are the types of things that somebody has to have to be successful in a transition like this. Or even if they aren't transitioning into a net new career and they're just looking for a promotion, more responsibility new company for a variety of reasons, these are things that you should still be looking for. So firstly, you have to have an actual process. So have a hiring process first. Don't just shoot from the HIP and hope that you're going to land the perfect employee. So put a little bit of thought into your hiring process and the easiest way to do that is to have some sort of scorecard where you know what great looks like and you have questions that you want to ask and you're you're scoring candidates against those questions and you've waited those questions based on...

...what you've seen good look like with other people that you've hired in your company. And if you're doing the first higher, you're hiring the person for the first time, then just make a really good guess and iterate on that process and improve on that score card. But have a score card, and not just a score card for the questions, but have a score card for questions that you're going to ask in the first interview, you're going to ask in the second interview, perhaps in a team interview, whatever that process looks like. And also have a process. So is it one interview that hired? Is it one interview with yourself, one interview with another individual in your organization, one interview with the team? Then hired? Is it record a short introduction video, do a disc profile assessment interview with you, then you're hired? What is your process? And there's pros and cons to a multitude of processes out there, but you have to have one. So make sure, before you hire somebody, map out those steps and hold yourself to those steps, because it will not only help you properly hire an individual, because you'll know and you'll be able to check off which questions or which tasks this person...

...has done so that every candidate has the same interview experience, you'll also be able to understand how efficient your hiring processes, how successful you're hiring processes. And the only way to improve something is to have a process in the first place. So have an actual interview process and write it down, codify it and use that and once you have an you actually have a hiring process, what should you look for? What are the most important things? So, in my personal opinion, of course skills are important, formal education, if required, is important, but the number one indicator of success for me is curiosity. So curiosity in having a problem and figuring out a solution without any mentorship or guidance. And it's not to say that you shouldn't help and give mentorship or guidance, but the ability for somebody to have the confidence to go out and find potential solutions to problems is a godsend as a hiring manager or as a founder or an executive, because if somebody thinks outside the box and figures out solutions, that means that you don't have to. So of course...

...you have to have those those hard skills, and that's fine, but you want to find people that are curious. So how do you actually do this? Give them problems. Well, first of all, two ways. Number one, give them problems, so give them a problem that they have definitely never encountered in their current career and understand their analytical skills, their investigative skills and their problem solving skills and get them to solve a problem that they've never solved ever before in their career and let them know, make them feel comfortable that there there aren't. They aren't expected to know the exact steps to solve this problem, but you want to test their ability to be curious and to figure stuff out, and if they can figure stuff out, especially in an interview context, is a good chance they can figure stuff out when they're actually in their job. So curious is important. And then also, not only can you give them a problem to solve in the actual interview, but you can also ask them to walk through a past circumstance where they had to solve a problem that they didn't have all the information about and what and or it couldn't it maybe was perhaps outside the context of what they were normally used to...

...doing in their job. So nothing routine, something that was truly outside the box, and ask them to walk through that process of okay, so what are the actual steps that you took to solve the problem? And speak in in specifics, so not high level and not we's and like what did you exactly do? So what was a problem? And reverse engineer the solution and get them to speak through every single action that they took to figure that out and if they can speak to every single action that they took and they can speak to their own actions that they took to solve a problem, even if it's as part of a larger team, that will be indicative of them actually doing the action to solve the problem and it wasn't just a team effort where five or ten people solve the problem. I want to understand exactly what they did, what research, what process, what insights they garnered from figuring out this problem that they didn't previously have an answer to. So that problem solving curiosity mindset, I think, is incredibly important. Secondly, you want people...

...that can have a passion for something. So it can be for their career, it can be for money, it can be for advancement in an organization, it can be for job title, it can be for a variety of thing, but if they have a passion and a commitment to get somewhere, it is your job as the manage your or the leader or the founder, to tie their personal and professional goals to the job that they're actually doing and then help facilitate unlocking that passion with their work they're doing in a day to day environment. So if they have a passion for something and if they have a goal, that's the most important and then it's on you to figure out how to tie that goal to the work that they're doing so that they're going to end up where they want to be. Because when you can align those two things, when an employees passion, making sure they have a passion, when an employees passion or vision or goal it can grow up with the organization's vision or goal, that's when the employee succeeds, the organization succeeds and you get a hundred and ten percent out of that person. So find out if they have a passion or if they have a goal. Ask them if they...

...have a one, three or five year plan for their personal lives. Where do they want to end up? Because if you know where they want to end up, it is now your job, like I said, to aligne where they want to end up with what you need to accomplish by hiring that person, and that's when those two goals are aligned, that's when you get everything out of that employee. And lastly, I want you to understand what your culture, your company's Culture, is, and I want you to understand that, instead of thinking as to whether or not that employee would fit, quote unquote, into a company's culture, which is the old dads. That's what you generally are focused on. Will this employee fit with the company culture? I want you to instead think about how that employee can add to the company these culture in a net positive way. So, of course, yes, getting along with the team is important, but try to find a value in the employee that they can bring. They can offer a different way of thinking, a different way of doing things. Copying and pasting your existing company's...

...culture is not a great thing to do and it's not beneficial to you as an organization. Okay, people may get along because they have the same past times or hobbies or whatnot, but realistically you're not challenging your organization, you're not forcing your organization to think differently if you hire a copy paste version of you or your team. So try and hire people that add perspective, add insight, fulfill the requirements of the job, but perhaps look at the job through a different Lens than the way you would look at that job. And when you can find people that add to your company's culture versus just copy paste replicate it, that's when your company becomes that much more effective, impactful, forward thinking, and it will take a little bit of testing and experimenting to understand how somebody can truly add to a culture. But if they, for example, are highly curious, have goals, have a vision as an individual,...

...as and also a professional goal and vision, and they check all the boxes in terms of doing the job and the experience that you would require to have to do the job, start to look for people that can add on to your company's culture and that's where you will find the most effect to most impactful employees, employees that do their job better than you could ever think of doing their job. Because at the end of the day, that's really the goal, right is to hire people that are smarter than you, that can figure things out that you can't figure out, because if you can do that, well, that's when you have a company that just absolutely takes off. It's not by hiring people that aren't curious, only listen, only follow, don't have passion, don't have vision and are just replicas of what your company already has. That's not going to take a company to the next level. But the three things that I mentioned, if you take those into consideration, when you're hiring, there's a good chance that those hires will provide value far outside the exact job description and job requisition that they've originally signed up for.

...anyways, some of the things that you should think about when you're hiring candidates that are more high level. I'll definitely do a few of these for more tactical which questions to ask, but I thought this was a good start for founders, early stage companies or potentially first time managers that are looking to hire their first few employees. anyways, that's been another ten minute MBA. Any business problems you have, don't worry, I got you. Have a great day. I'll see you tomorrow. Have a great day. I'll see you tomorrow.

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